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Two exhibitions, two generations at the Venise Cadre gallery in Casablanca

The Venise Cadre gallery (GVCC) in Casablanca held a double opening of twi exhibitions, on October 5th, y Moroccan artists Meryem El Alj and Mehdi Melhaoui.

The artistic approach of Meryem El Alj is part of a purely pictorial research. According to a statement by the gallery, her work draws its origins from the foundations of the support / surface movement.

The gallery affirms that the juxtaposition, overlapping and superposition of matter, shapes, drawings and colors create a movement and provides a depth that the artist ends up covering completely or partially with a transparent veil, to reveal the palimpsest image of her memory.

Born in 1964 in Rabat, Meryem El Alj lives and works in Casablanca. After obtaining a degree of the School of Fine Arts of Tetouan and the certificate of visual art at the American School of Tangier in 1983 (Atelier of Louise Bourgeois), she enrolled at the school of Beaux- arts of Nîmes where she obtained her (DNSEP) degree in 1986.

On the hand, Moroccan French-German Mehdi Melhaoui, was born in Casablanca in 1983. He graduated from the EPCC in 2010 (Ecole Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Montpellier). Since 2003, Mehdi Melhaoui has participated in collective exhibitions in Morocco, Algeria, Germany and France. 2007 marks the beginning of a series of public commissions and prizes that rewarded his work, in particular the MAIF Contemporary Sculpture Award in 2010. In the same year, a public commission in Languedoc Roussillon gave birth to « Boat », a sculpture in bronze and stainless steel that can be discovered at the Henri Prades Museum in Lattes.

For this new experience with the GVCC, Mehdi Melhaoui pays particular attention to this moving and draped figure called Ninfa – a sort of personification or half-goddess of the eternal returns of the ancient form.

An interrogation of art from the point of view of the « survivals of antiquity ». Ninfa is, for him, this symbolic figure, she is just as much a Madonna, a mourner or a representation of the nymph of today.

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